Blog
Posted on August 29, 2017 8:00 AM by David Frasure
Categories: Disciple-making
I once had the experience of ministering to a couple.  The husband had a serious illness.  The wife asked me not to share the information with the church family.  Reluctantly, I agreed to tell our people they would be back in church soon, but they were taking a little break.  The couple attended fairly frequently, but they never came to Sunday School.  Several months later, the husband died.  Because the couple was not plugged into a small group in our church, I was the only one to visit in the hospital and only a handful of church members came to the funeral.  The lady was hurt that the church had not taken more interest in her plight and she quickly became an inactive Christian.  It was sad.
 
Over my years in ministry I have learned what research clarifies.  When a person attends worship services only, it is easy for them to get lost in the crowd and miss out on the important ministry of a small group.  They easily feel disconnected and soon fade away from the church.
 
Small group ministry is clearly a biblical ministry concept.  We see in Acts that the small groups of the New Testament church were held in houses before the church had the benefit of the nice buildings we enjoy today.  In the Bible, small groups were important in meeting the practical needs of the congregation.  Jethro helped Moses see value in breaking up his ministry into small groups.  Nehemiah understood that the construction of the protective wall around Jerusalem needed to be organized into small groups.  When Jesus feed the 5,000, he broke the people up into smaller groups to expedite the ministry (Luke 9).  When a church organizes itself in small groups, like Sunday School classes, it is following a biblical pattern of ministry.
 
As a church grows larger, it must also grow smaller.  LifeWay’s recent research showed that four out of five new members will be inactive in five years if they do not join a small group.  People make friends, or they “make tracks!”  The Billy Graham Evangelistic Association says that generally, new converts who do not make seven to twelve new friends in the church within six months of their conversion, will not continue to attend.  It is difficult to make that many new friends in the worship service, alone. 
 
Small Group/Sunday School ministry is designed to meet the practical needs of the people.  The “one another’s” (see John 13:34, Rom. 15:4, 1 Cor. 12:25, Eph. 4:32, etc.) of the New Testament are best carried out in the context of small groups.  In Acts 12, Peter miraculously escaped from prison.  When he was freed, he went to John Mark’s home to find that a small group was praying for his release.  That’s what small groups do!  Ephesians 4:11-12 remind us that pastors equip the church members, so we all can do the ministry together.  Small groups organize the church to carry out that biblical plan of ministry.
 
Small groups help protect us from backsliding (Jer. 3:14).  In the book, Transformational Small Groups by Ed Stetzer and Eric Geiger, they site research from nearly 3,000 Christians that show that people in Sunday School or small groups are significantly more likely to read their Bibles, pray for others, attend worship, tithe their income and minister to other people.  Christians involved in small groups are more apt to demonstrate those actions of a true disciple of Jesus.  Friends, I have seen too many families endure much heartache from alcoholism, drug overdose and divorce.  I realize that going to Sunday School does not guarantee that these things will never strike a Christian’s home, but it certainly does give them a better shot at being successful.
 
Dave Frasure is CABA's Disciple-making Catalyst and pastors FBC So. Lebanon, Oh. 
Posted on August 25, 2017 10:00 AM by David Frasure
Categories: Disciple-making
Mother Teresa was a nun, famous for her work with the impoverished people of Calcutta, India.  An American tourist in India stood by in awe one day as he watched Mother Teresa lovingly clean the infected wounds of a horribly disfigured leper.  He commented, “I wouldn’t do that for a million dollars!” Her response, “Neither would I, brother. Neither would I.”  Mother Teresa was motivated by love, not money.  Her desire was to serve God by serving people in need.
 
I realize that leading a Sunday School class is much different than caring for orphans or providing for a dying person, but each can be motivated by love.  I believe love is the reason we have such a wonderful Sunday School faculty of teachers and workers, and I want to thank each of you for serving and working so faithfully in the 2016-17 Sunday School year. 
 
 
We realize that the numbers do not tell the complete story.  There are those intangibles that are difficult to measure, but we can “feel” them.  For example, there is a wonderful positive spirit in many of our classes that seems to fuel the growth.  Even as we had to deal with using our rooms for a few special events and many purposes other than Sunday School, our people stayed positive.  Such a spirit pleases the Lord and it aids our mission to touch our world for Jesus.
 
When we do the work of the Lord, we know it means we are also engaged in a spiritual battle.  As our teachers and workers have stayed faithful in prayer it has brought positive results.  I know many have been in some spiritual conflicts this year.  Some have had to deal with some difficult family crises while others have had physical infirmities.  Satan has certainly not made it easy for any of us.  Yet again, you all have stayed committed to do the work.  God has blessed that kind of dedication.
 
As we look back, I cannot help but to look forward to the new year with great anticipation.  As we continue our efforts, I believe by this time next year we can see our people growing stronger in their love for the Lord and their love for one another.  As more people are under the influence of good Bible teaching, families become stronger, the church becomes stronger and people are saved.  May God bless you for your willingness to serve.
 
Dave Frasure is CABA's Disciple-making Catalyst and pastors FBC So. Lebanon
Posted on August 24, 2017 3:00 PM by David Frasure
Categories: Disciple-making
It seems we cannot get away from the subject of “racism” today.  I put the term in quotations because the concept of race being determined by the pigmentation of one’s skin is foreign to the Bible.  Some translations use the term “race,” but it is to describe the people of a certain nation or people group—the emphasis is not on skin tone.  Racism is an evil sin in our world.  The Bible clearly condemns such an attitude toward people of another skin tone. 
 
Here’s three reasons.
 
1. All humans are made in the image of God.  Every human life is valuable and precious for this reason.  It doesn’t matter the age, nationality, gend
er, mental capacity, etc. of the person.  He or she is made in the image of God with consciousness and the spiritual potential to know and love God and experience the miracle of a saving relationship through faith in Christ.  Each person is a living soul, making him or her a unique and special creation of God.
 
The idea that one person is superior to another because of skin color or nationality, is something that was promoted by Darwin and propagated by early evolutionists.  An African man was literally a part of a zoo exhibit at the Bronx zoo in the early 1900’s alongside an orangutan.  The evolutionists believed it somehow proved their theory.  In that day, many believed that Australian Aborigines tribes were lesser humans and a missing link between apes and humans.  The thought is ridiculous in our century, but the damage was done back then, and it supported the idea of slavery.  The Bible tells quite a different story of human origins and helps us see ourselves as all being from one Creator.
 
2. Skin tone is a genetic trait like hair color or eye color.  In Genesis 3:20, we clearly see that Eve, Adam’s wife, was the mother of all living.  That means that every person on earth, regardless of skin tone, is ultimately from Adam and Eve’s genepool.  In addition, we can conclude that the various shades of color that humans possess today, were all present in Adam and Eve’s genetic makeup—just like other physical features that make us all unique.  I once heard someone say that Cain’s mark (Genesis 4:15) was dark skin.  The idea is preposterous.  If I mark an animal by painting a red “X” on his fur, his children are not born with red marks.  Likewise, Cain’s mark, whatever it was, was on him alone because he killed a man and the Bible does not say it was passed on to his children.
 
During the confusion of languages at the Tower of Babel (Genesis 11), people did divide into language groups, and likely, nationalities at that time.  It makes sense that as the people were scattered, groups of darker and lighter skinned people may have been attracted to climate conditions that were favorable to the pigmentation of their skin.  Fair-skinned people don’t like to feel the pain of a sunburn, so they headed north to avoid longer, hotter summers.  There was nothing superior about one skin tone over the other. 
 
3. The gospel of Jesus Christ makes all people one in Him regardless of skin tone, eye color, gender, nationality, etc.  First Corinthians 12:12-13 and many other passages, indicate that in Christ we are all part of one body.  There is no spiritual distinction between people of different skin colors in Christ.  In fact, I believe that the gospel of Jesus is what our society really needs to see the foolishness of modern racism.  In Christ, our access to God is the same.  In Christ, our gender or nationality is insignificant.  Jesus is truly the answer to the hate and foolish rhetoric of our day.  There should never be a race problem for those who are in Christ Jesus our Lord.
 
Dave Frasure is CABA's Disciple-making Catalyst and pastors FBC So. Lebanon.
Posted on August 23, 2017 10:00 AM by David Frasure
Categories: Disciple-making
It seems we cannot get away from the subject of “racism” today.  I put the term in quotations because the concept of race being determined by the pigmentation of one’s skin is foreign to the Bible.  Some translations use the term “race,” but it is to describe the people of a certain nation or people group—the emphasis is not on skin tone.  Racism is an evil sin in our world.  The Bible clearly condemns such an attitude toward people of another skin tone. 
 
Here’s three reasons.
 
1. All humans are made in the image of God.  Every human life is valuable and precious for this reason.  It doesn’t matter the age, nationality, gender, mental capacity, etc. of the person.  He or she is made in the image of God with consciousness and the spiritual potential to know and love God and experience the miracle of a saving relationship through faith in Christ.  Each person is a living soul, making him or her a unique and special creation of God.
 
The idea that one person is superior to another because of skin color or nationality, is something that was promoted by Darwin and propagated by early evolutionists.  An African man was literally a part of a zoo exhibit at the Bronx zoo in the early 1900’s alongside an orangutan.  The evolutionists believed it somehow proved their theory.  In that day, many believed that Australian Aborigines tribes were lesser humans and a missing link between apes and humans.  The thought is ridiculous in our century, but the damage was done and back then, and it supported the idea of slavery.  The Bible tells quite a different story of human origins and helps us see ourselves as all being from one Creator.
2. Skin tone is a genetic trait like hair color or eye color.  In Genesis 3:20, we clearly see that Eve, Adam’s wife, was the mother of all living.  That means that every person on earth, regardless of skin tone, is ultimately from Adam and Eve’s genepool.  In addition, we can conclude that the various shades of color that humans possess today, were all present in Adam and Eve’s genetic makeup—just like other physical features that make us all unique.  I once heard someone say that Cain’s mark (Genesis 4:15) was dark skin.  The idea is preposterous.  If I mark an animal by painting a red “X” on his fur, his children are not born with red marks.  Likewise, Cain’s mark, whatever it was, was on him alone because he killed a man and the Bible does not say it was passed on to his children.
During the confusion of languages at the Tower of Babel (Genesis 11), people did divide into language groups, and likely, nationalities at that time.  It makes sense that as the people were scattered, groups of darker and lighter skinned people may have been attracted to climate conditions that were favorable to the pigmentation of their skin.  Fair-skinned people don’t like to feel the pain of a sunburn, so they headed north to avoid longer, hotter summers.  There was nothing superior about one skin tone over the other. 
3. The gospel of Jesus Christ makes all people one in Him regardless of skin tone, eye color, gender, nationality, etc.  First Corinthians 12:12-13 and many other passages, indicate that in Christ we are all part of one body.  There is no spiritual distinction between people of different skin colors in Christ.  In fact, I believe that the gospel of Jesus is what our society really needs to see the foolishness of modern racism.  In Christ, our access to God is the same.  In Christ, our gender or nationality is insignificant.  Jesus is truly the answer to the hate and foolish rhetoric of our day.  There should never be a race problem for those who are in Christ Jesus our Lord.
Posted on August 8, 2017 10:00 AM by David Frasure
Categories: Disciple-making
Charles Spurgeon was a famous preacher in England many years ago.  He had a wonderful eloquence with the English language.  He once described prayer as “the slender nerve that moves the muscle of omnipotence.”  What a thought!  Imagine the almighty muscle of our great God, being put into action by the slender nerve of a common prayer from people like us. 
 
We all desire that God would work through and bless the Bible Study lessons we prepare and present to our class each week.  God’s blessing on our presentation is not by accident.  He will always bless His Word as it is taught since He does not allow His Word to return to Him void and empty.  But another determining factor to the effectiveness of our teaching has got to be prayer.
 
Prayer is obviously part of the entire preparation process.  As you study and look for good illustrations and read commentaries, it is important to be praying.  Ask the Lord to show you what will meet the needs and capture the attention of your class the best.  It is always an amazing thing when you feel God leading you to make a certain point in a lesson and later have a person come to you, sharing a specific way God used that point to speak to her life.  Let’s give praise and glory to His name, as He responds to the simple prayers of His teachers.
 
Prayer is vital for the teacher’s personal life.  Establishing a daily quiet time with the Lord is the most important thing any teacher can do to be an effective teacher of the Word.  A quiet time has at least two parts to it—time in the Bible, allowing God to speak to you, and time in prayer, allowing you to speak to God.  It is the most important discipline to establish in the life of a growing disciple. 
 
There was a time when I felt it was self-centered to pray for myself, but I have grown to realize that other people depend on my walk with God.  The people we minister to anticipate that we have gotten something in our study that they need to hear.  If we are not praying for insight and guidance from God, we are really letting our people down!  I guess we could say that praying for one’s self is quite unselfish in the bigger picture of things.
 
Prayer also has the ability to connect your heart to the hearts of your pupils.  Effective teachers have learned the great value in praying for the people they teach.  A great tool is to make up a prayer list that includes the names of each of your students and the prospects for your class.  The list can become quite lengthy; so, many teachers divide the names by five and pray for a part of the list each day, Monday through Friday.  Some teachers even put a photo next to the person’s name with room to write out prayer concerns.
 
Prayer is also needed for the lessen presentation.  During your Sunday morning quiet time, be sure to pray for God’s blessing and presence upon the lesson as well as other teachers and ministers in your church.  Prayerfully review your lesson, being open to any last-minute changes the Lord may want to give you.  Pray before you begin to teach and pray afterwards that God would apply these truths to everyone’s heart.

As you teach the Bible, you are involved in a very spiritual process.  You are literally handling the things of God.  You are shaping lives for God’s glory and honor.  Such an awesome task must be bathed in prayer to achieve the spiritual results we desire.
 
Dave Frasure is CABA's Disciple-making Catalyst and pastors First Baptist South Lebanon, Oh. .
Posted on August 3, 2017 10:00 AM by David Frasure
Categories: Evangelism
Have you heard the new lyrics to an old song?  It goes like this, “Old McBaptist had a farm; E-I-E-I-O.  And ‘round that farm he plants the Word; E-I-E-I-O.  With a plow, plow here and a plant, plant there…”  The tune is familiar and hopefully, the words do not seem so strange to us.  The Bible often uses the imagery of a farmer when speaking of the work of God.  Jesus spoke of the sower going out to sow the seed of God’s Word.  Paul encouraged Timothy to be like a hard-working farmer as he discipled people and looked for spiritual fruit in their lives. 
 
Every farmer knows that in order to receive a harvest in the fall, someone must plow the field, sow the seed, pray for rain and eventually, harvest the crop.  It would be foolish to expect a harvest when there has been no plowing, or planting, or praying.  A dormant field does not a harvest make!
 
A dormant church cannot expect a harvest either.  Members of God’s church must get themselves face-to-face with lost people and have a gospel conversation in order to reach them for Christ.  The Great Commission reminds us that we are witnesses wherever we go, but we can also be intentional about setting up gospel encounters.
 
Dave Frasure is CABA's Disciple-making Catalyst and pastors FBC So. Lebanon. 
 
Posted on July 31, 2017 10:00 AM by David Frasure
Categories: Disciple-making
I was reading a book recently that was written by two Navy SEALs Commanders.  They shared stories about various combat experiences and brought out relevant principles for developing great teams in any setting.  Over and over, these soldiers emphasized the need for a clear understanding, extreme commitment and professional implementation of the mission.  They recognized that ego and personal agenda had to be set aside in order for their troops to take ownership of the mission.  If they failed, lives would be lost and victory would be impossible.
 
Our mission is to reach lost people and lead them to become devoted disciples of the Lord Jesus Christ.  Christians can lose sight of this foundational principle of church and small group ministry.  When we do, lives can be lost for eternity.  Most churches have great teaching opportunities for helping people grow, once they are inside the church building.  But, as we know, unreached people are not in the building.  Here are four reasons we keep the focus on reaching new people.
 
1. God commands it in His Word.  That should be enough motivation for any Christian. The Great Commission is found in Matthew 28:18-20.  Jesus’ final command before He left earth included reaching people with the Gospel message.  These “marching orders” are repeated in the other three gospels and in the book of Acts.  The New Testament Church took the Great Commission very seriously and thus, evangelism became the priority mission of the church.
 
2. People cannot be discipled until they are first reached.  Teaching people is a function of Sunday School, but it must not become the mission of the Sunday School.  Christians need to grow deeper in the Lord, but have you ever asked yourself why?  What is the purpose of spiritual maturity if it is not, at least in part, to equip believers to obey the Great Commission?  If a Christian is growing “deeper,” yet with no real concern about the eternal destiny of the unreached people in the community and the world, is he or she really that close to the heart of Jesus?  The closer we are to Him, the more obvious our love for the lost will become.
 
3. It creates a healthy church focus. When a local church begins to put too much focus on politics, or music style, or the building, or social reform, or denomination, reaching people becomes a very casual activity.  Besides that, who wants to bring a in a lost neighbor to class or service, only to have the leader blast anyone with a different political view or another viewpoint on gun control?  Certainly, Christians are to be “salt and light” and we need to be involved as patriots and engaged in public reform that aligns itself with Scripture.  Yet to make any of these things the primary focus of the church will create an unhealthy environment with very limited evangelistic potential.  People need the Lord no matter their political affiliation or views on the border wall. 
 
4. It is fulfilling for God’s people.  Any church worth the bricks it is built with rejoices to see lost people come to faith in the Lord Jesus Christ.  The salvation of souls is something only God can do, and when a church family sees people coming to Christ, it is evidence of God’s work in their midst.  The Christians in such a congregation are thrilled as new believers are added to the Lord.
 
Let me encourage you to develop a personal prayer list of lost people that are within your circle of influence.  In Sunday School, pray for those who can be reached through the ministry of your class.  Let’s make it a real priority to contact these people regularly with an invitation to attend your class and to know the Savior.  The success of the mission depends on such things.
 
Dave Frasure is CABA's Disciple-making Catalyst and also pastors First Baptist South Lebanon, Oh. 
Posted on July 24, 2017 2:00 AM by David Frasure
Categories: Disciple-making
I recently watched my son as he was teaching my grandson to ride a bike.  As the scene unfolded before my eyes, I began to reminisce and become reflective, but in that moment, I also saw a need that we tend to overlook—the need for balance!  Without it, you can spend a lot of time skinned up and hurting.  That’s true for bike riding and it is true in the church as well. 
 
Balanced ministry all begins with the right objective—seeking and obeying God’s vision.  At this point in our church history, we have not lost our desire to be a family of friends on mission with God.  We have not lost the priorities of worshiping God, building believers and sharing Christ with our world, while surrounding that all in prayer.  In recent days, however, we have also sensed God is leading us to be a church of all generations that is focused on reaching the next generation.  That vision moves us and guides us in the decisions we make along the way.
 
We also know that God blesses hard work, so we do not look for an easy way out.  A sweet spirit is also essential in a church.  A negative spirit can drive away more people than the best outreach can bring in!  So, we seek to serve Christ and one another with attitudes of love, humility and encouragement.  This way others get the credit and God gets the glory, and that’s okay with us.  We know these attitudes are essential to our success as a church.  This is the kind of church environment God enjoys blessing and we are committed to it, even if it requires constant effort.
 
Our Sunday morning worship services are vital to the success of our ministry.  They are like 52 big events each year that need to be done with excellence.  A great deal of time goes into planning and preparing each service.  Our Sunday morning activities involve the largest number of members and guests, so they are worthy of our best efforts.  We know we must do small group ministry well, in order to minister to every age range in our church and reach every age range in our community.  Sunday School done right impacts every area of church ministry as people grow in Christ and are prepared to become church leaders.
 
Our deliberate focus on the next generation follows a very scriptural mindset.  Throughout the Bible, God has emphasized the need to teach and nurture the next generation.  We also understand that two-thirds of the Christians in America are saved before they become adults.  It is strategic to be intentional about getting the gospel message to children and teens.  In the bigger picture, we realize that the future of our church depends on our present investment in the lives of our children and teens.
 
We approach ministry with three core values.  The first is a commitment to the Bible as the foundation for our beliefs and our practices.  The Bible is without error as God is the ultimate author of the Bible.  We will continue to be committed to strengthening families.  We know God designed the church so that each member is a minister, not just the “trained professionals.” 
 
My grandchild has successfully learned to ride the bicycle.  I’m sure he will get even better with practice.  But no matter his skill level, he must always start with good balance.  So, must we.
 
Dave Frasure is CABA's Disciple-making Catalyst and pastors FBC So. Lebanon, Oh.
Posted on July 17, 2017 8:00 AM by David Frasure
Categories: Disciple-making
Perhaps you have seen the illustration a college professor provided for his freshman class.  In a large bowl, he placed some big rocks and he asked the class if the bowl was full.  They said, “Yes,” until he poured in some pea-sized gravel.  He asked again if the bowl was full.  They hesitated but agreed.  The, the teacher poured in sand and tamped it down.  The class was sure the bowl was now full.  With a smile, the professor brought out a pitcher of water as the class laughed. 
 
The wise teacher then shared the point of his demonstration.  He pointed out that they all would have the same amount of time to receive their education and prepare for their future.  Then he smiled and said, “Be sure to put the big rocks in first or they will never fit in the time you have here.”  Wow, isn’t that the truth?  Even in the work of the church, we have a lot of little things that can crowd out the most important things.  If we don’t get the big things done, the work of God will suffer.  So, what are the big things that we’ve got to do well?  Let me suggest four.
 
We’ve got to provide a quality worship experience that touches every generation.  That means that we don’t just sing the songs that my generation prefers, but we include songs each generation can relate to.  We are deliberate about this.  We want to be a church that helps all generations worship God.  We are a church of many generations that has a deliberate focus on the next generation and that will show up in the way we worship.
 
We’ve got to have a ministry of excellence to the next generation and their parents, in an environment of security, promoting age-appropriate discipleship.  We know that Jesus had a huge heart for children.  We also know that the world often sees children as an annoyance and a bother.  Some churches even see children’s ministry as a necessary inconvenience.  We must reject that attitude and embrace the vision to impact children and teens with the gospel of Jesus.  We are delighted that we have staff members and dedicated volunteers who work diligently with our teens and children and we look forward to supporting them and encouraging these young people to become the church of tomorrow and today.
 
We’ve got to do Sunday School/Small Groups to the best of our abilities.  Small Groups were a Part of the New Testament Strategy for Discipleship.  The early church met “house to house” in small groups for fellowship, evangelism, ministry and teaching.  Our Small Group strategy follows tried and proved actions.  We envision the possibilities based on enrollment, prospects and demographics, we enlarge the organization to meet the expectations of future growth, we provide the space and equipment to allow our small groups to be successful, we enlist and train workers to provide the best teaching and ministry we can, and we go after the people because we know we have to initiate the contact.
 
We’ve got to make a real impact on our community with meaningful ministry and deliberate involvement.  One of the reasons our church is going to hold a worship service in the park on August 6 is so we can have a better chance to touch our community with truth.  We are using the fourth Sunday evening services of the daylight-savings months for outreach in our community.  In the cold-weather months, we set up and promote special events that will attract people in our community to attend.  As a church, we understand that we cannot just expect the community to come to us to hear the gospel—we’ve got to go to them and invite them in!  The Great Commission puts the responsibility on us to go, not on them to come.
 
Dave Frasure is CABA's Disciple-making Catalyst and pastors FBC So. Lebanon, Oh. 
Posted on July 5, 2017 10:00 AM by David Frasure
Categories: Disciple-making
A real Southern Baptist Church, that will remain anonymous, hired an expensive church consultant group (also anonymous) that came to evaluate the church to help them deal with their plateau in church attendance.  The church was sincerely concerned about their effectiveness in reaching and keeping new people.  The consultant took their money and left a long list of suggestions that included things like new paint in the sanctuary, the start of a more effective greeting ministry and renovation of the nurseries.  While the ideas were all good, the changes the church made did little to help them reach new people for Christ. 
 
The people were frustrated with the results of all their hard work.  One of the members had a son who was in ministry at a growing church and he asked a simple question that helped the church discover the real problem with their attendance plateau.  The chart to the right shows the church’s attendance and number of Sunday School classes in the church.  They realized that they had no increase in attendance because they had not added any new classes in over 10 years.  When they added new teaching units, the growth of the church began to increase again. 
 
Allan Taylor, a Sunday School trainer and consultant with LifeWay Christian Resources, refers to this pattern as the pyramid principle.  The principle simply states that as the base of the pyramid increases (the number of classes in a church); the height of the pyramid (the Sunday School attendance) can also increase.  If the base is not increased, the height remains the same and this becomes a barrier to the growth in every other important area of the church.  The church cannot keep the same structure in place and honestly expect different results.
 
As our church gets ready for the new Sunday School year in September, we must seriously consider the base of our church’s Sunday School pyramid.  Our current structure of 17 classes is allowing us to have an average attendance of about 150 in Sunday School.  That’s about one class for nine attendees.  Generally speaking, a good growth ratio of classes to attendees is 1 to 8 to start off a new year of growth.  Imagine what might happen if we could add two or three new classes in the upcoming Sunday School year, starting in September.
 
New classes/groups can be added in various ways.  An established class can choose to start a “mission class” out of their class.  A team can start a new group after Easter or a big Sunday, with the new people who visited the church and several prospects.  A New Member’s Class can be started and allowed to develop into an ongoing class.  A class can be started after a big revival emphasis as new converts become active in church life.  A new group can be started to meet a special need or to offer a different curriculum choice.
 
New units can be started in various ways and be effectively launched with winning TEAMS made up of a Teacher, an Evangelism leader, an Apprentice Teacher, a Member Care Leader and a Secretary/Support person.  With these five people in position, the class is prepared for a successful launch and the opportunity to grow and obey the Great Commission to reach people and make disciples for Christ—and no offense to the Hokey Pokey—that’s what it is all about!
 
NOTE:  Allan Taylor is coming to Cincinnati. He is the keynote speaker for the Boldly Grow Conference on Saturday, October 7, 2017, at FBC South Lebanon. Reserve your spot by calling (513) 724-7182. 
 
Dave Frasure is CABA's Disciple-making Catalyst and pastors FBC S. Lebanon.