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Posted on January 15, 2019 8:00 AM by David Frasure
Categories: Disciple-making
A friend of mine once asked a group of pastors, “Other than leading people to Christ and preaching, what is one other thing in ministry that truly excites you?”  When it came my turn to respond, my answer was easy.  For me, one of the most exciting things in ministry is to see normal, average, garden-variety Christians (like me and you) being used of God to do great things for His glory.  As a pastor, it thrills my heart to see God using our people to impact His kingdom, and I can think of no better avenue for doing that than the Sunday School ministry of our church.  In the context of the Sunday School class, teachers and leaders can see lives transformed, marriages restored, relationships reconciled, addictions overcome, leaders sent out, attendance increase and God glorified.  That sounds a whole lot like the book of Acts to me.  It makes my socks want to roll up and down while my heart leaps out of my chest as an ahooga-horn sounds come out of my ears!
 
One of the things that disturb me about many modern church growth philosophies is the subtle message that says, “Leave the real ministry to the professionals.”  Though it is never stated, it is communicated.  When a pastor or church planter presents his plan for reaching people and growing the church it often focuses on the church members inviting all their friends and relatives to come hear him preach and teach.  That smacks of a big ego and does not remotely match up with the idea of “equipping the saints for the work of the ministry” found in Ephesians 4:12.
 
God’s body building plan has a different kind of focus.  He intends for pastor’s and staff members to build up the congregation of believers and to equip them to do ministry so all of us can enjoy the privilege of being used of God in significant ways.  Sunday School ministry is a very practical outlet for God’s people to get involved in real ministry that involves more than licking envelopes and changing rolls of toilet tissue.  You see, we each have a Great Commission responsibility.  Reaching people and discipling people does not require a seminary degree and I think it is wrong to imply such a thing. 
 
Before I answered God’s call into ministry, my first opportunity for service came through my Sunday School class.  I was appointed the task of being the Outreach Leader for our young couples class.  I received a small metal box with a stack of 4 x 6 cards for enrollees and prospects for our class.  God used that experience to shape my life.  I can still remember setting aside a day each week to fast and pray during my lunch break for the growth of our little class of six people.  I would make phone calls each week and encourage people on their birthdays and anniversaries.  We planned a few fellowship times at different homes.  Little by little we saw our group grow and God add people to His kingdom as He blessed the work we did.  Our attendance doubled in a year and it was about ready to triple when Terri and I began to follow God’s calling on our life and moved to Texas.  Our class bought us a new set of tires— maybe it was love or maybe they were making sure we made it out of town, but either way it sure was a blessing!
 
That ministry to that small group of young adults prepared me for greater avenues of ministry and the things I learned then still go with me today.  I was leading a conference not too long ago when a lady came up to share that she was a member of that class.  Of course, I remembered her, but what I didn’t know was how God used a simple birthday card to encourage her in a time of desperation.  As she told me the story, I became all the more convinced of the great value of Sunday School ministry.  Ahooga!  There go those socks, again.
Posted on January 14, 2019 9:00 AM by David Frasure
Categories: Disciple-making
Arthur Flake was one of Sunday School’s great pioneers.  Mr. Flake was a committed lay-leader who had such success in his local church as a Sunday School Director, that he was eventually asked to be a field worker for the Baptist Sunday School Board.  In the early 1900’s, he was asked to move to Nashville to become the head of the Sunday School department there.  Since then, Flake’s Five-Step Formula has been used over 100 years now to inspire churches to use the Sunday School to reach and disciple people for Jesus.  “What are the five steps?”  I'm glad you asked.
 
Flake’s first principle of Sunday School growth is “Know Your Possibilities.”  That is, know who you’re trying to reach so you can go after the people and build your Sunday School.  Every Sunday School class has great, yet sometimes unreached potential.  Some class leaders may think, “We do not have any prospects, or even suspects!”  The truth is you likely have prospects you haven't even considered.
 
Many Sunday School Directors provide a list of prospects to go after.  You will likely also have many people attending church services that are not involved in a Sunday School class.  These can also become key prospects.  You also need to be on the lookout for visitors who might be prospects for your class.  With these names and addresses in your Sunday School records, you will be able to make phone calls, send letters and make visits to these prospects.  View these people as your regular prospects and keep in touch with them and invite them to Sunday School.
 
Flake’s second principle is “Enlarge the Organization.”  Basically, this principle deals with adding new classes on a regular basis.  Sometimes this means starting a new class as a “mission class” formed out of an existing class.  Maybe five or six people feel led to start the class in order to double the potential.  Sometimes a new class can be started after a surge in growth as a part of a new members’ class.  Whatever the method, starting new groups is one key to church growth.
 
The third principle is “Provide Space and Equipment.”  You cannot get 13 eggs in a carton designed for a dozen.  The principle holds for Sunday School classrooms as well.  Before building expensive space, however, churches should consider other options such as providing two Sunday School times or holding classes in the evening or off campus in homes.
 
The fourth principle is “Enlist and Train Workers.”  Most people do not volunteer to teach or work in Sunday School unless they are asked and challenged to do so.  A quick tour of a Sunday School Teacher’s Quarterly is not adequate training, that’s why churches offer annual training events and regular in-service training opportunities throughout the year.  Even McDonald’s requires the grill cooks to go through “Hamburger University” training.  It only makes sense to have training for teaching God’s Book and doing God’s work.
 
The fifth principle is “Go After the People.”  Even in our day of technology, there is nothing like a face to face encounter to let people know you are interested in them.  Every business knows this to be true.  It is why they spend a great deal of money sending sales reps out to meet clients all over the world.  We are involved in the Father’s business of reaching and discipling people.  This too requires some face to face interaction with lost, unreached church members and unchurched people.  Flake’s formula is “old school,” but it still works when churches (and classes) work it.
Posted on December 27, 2018 8:00 AM by Mark Snowden
Categories: Disciple-making
A few years ago, I conducted research in 15 small groups using Bible Storying as their method of disciple-making. When looking through transcripts with leaders and experiencing their work, four themes emerged. These elements became four keys to success among those who were doing it best.
 
The small groups that were growing spiritually and numerically were relational, supportive, transparent, and accountable.
 
Accountability is what needs the most attention. It had to be in the DNA of the group.
 
Obedience and accountability are two major bonding elements in discipleship. How much time and effort does your present small group or Bible study class take to make specific applications and ensure that members put them into practice individually and as a group?
 
What No Place Left teaches in Discovery Bible Studies (and I do in TruthSticks Bible studies) and in my orality workshops leads people to obey the commands and examples in the stories. Obedience is simple to talk about, but not so easy to do. But with orality being so reproducible, those telling Bible truths over and over can't help but witness more and grow more, too.
 
If we know these four keys, why don't we do them? Margie Blanchard, wife of author Ken Blanchard (One Minute Manager, Lead Like Jesus), says, “The gap between knowing and doing is significantly greater than the gap between ignorance and knowledge.”
 
We, as NPL practitioners, need to hold people accountable to what we volunteer to do. We'll never get to church unless discipline is in our discipling.
 
-- Mark Snowden is the Director for Missional Leadership, Cincinnati Area Baptist Association. 
This blog was originally posted in No Place Left Ohio's Facebook page.
Posted on November 1, 2018 10:00 AM by David Frasure
Categories: Disciple-making
Recently we introduced a new mentoring/discipleship plan we developed for our church. This plan uses materials developed by my wife Terri and me over three decades of ministry together. The material is designed as a “launching pad” for mentoring/discipleship relationships.
 
The mentors will have six meetings with a mentee, using the material to guide a discipling relationship that can be adapted to the needs of the participants. I want our Association to be aware of the materials, in case a pastor or church leader would like to begin their own mentoring relationship with a friend, associate or family member or use it in their local church.
 
The plan follows these five basic guidelines:
 
FIVE Inductive Bible studies are used each week that the mentee can do in about 20 minutes as part of his daily Quiet Time with God—these are reviewed in the weekly meeting with the mentor FOUR Basic objectives are involved—to grow closer to God, grow closer to others, be used of God to build and strengthen His kingdom, and help mentees become discipleship-makers 
 
THREE Principles to keep in mind—this is about a process. It involves a transparent mentor/mentee relationship and it requires a flexible, open-ended approach, resulting in mutual growth.
 
TWO Bible verses are committed to memory each week ONE weekly meeting with your discipleship mentee covering the assigned material.
 
If anyone has interest in this, I would like to offer the materials free of charge in a Word document, with the    understanding that it will never be sold.  Email me at pastor@gotofbc.com if you are interested.  If you would like me and a couple of our men to provide a three-hour introduction to this discipling/mentoring plan in your church, please call me at 513-315-7575 and we will work something out.
 
David Frasure is CABA's Disciple-making Ministry Catalyst and he pastors First Baptist, South Lebanon.
Posted on October 15, 2018 10:00 AM by Mark Snowden
Categories: Disciple-making
     How people learn is important. How they progress toward belief and action is more important. 

     A white-haired man was introduced to me after preaching. He was starting a church in the next town over, but his comment startled me. “Mark, I appreciated what you said about new believers knowing more lost people. In all my years of ministry, I never thought about training up a new believer to share their faith. And I wanted you to know I’ll be going out with them to share Jesus with their family and friends. I’m headed out right now to start that in my ministry.” You could see the determination in his eyes. It wasn’t too late for him to learn and act.

     There’s a social phenomenon that God instilled in each of us. We respond to innovations that bring change at different rates. When I was studying marketing, I was fascinated by the work of Everett M. Rogers, an Iowa farmer’s kid-turned-scholar. His father was reluctant to use a hybrid corn until a drought proved its worth.

     Rogers identified segments of society that would adopt new ideas and tools. Innovators (2.5%), Early Adopters (13.5%), Early Majority (34%), Late Majority (34%), and Laggards (16%). If you plot this on a graph, it makes a nice bell curve. Those in authority tend to be Laggards while those with the most education and income tend to be Innovators. But Innovators can be fickle although they’ll try practically anything new.

     James F. Engel picked up on this and while teaching at Wheaton College and proposed a numerical scale from -8 (lost) to 0 (conversion) to +3 (discipleship). The Engel Scale provides a way of tracking evangelism-discipleship spiritual progress.

    Jesus was way ahead of Rogers and Engel when He taught in the parable of the sower (Mark 4:1-20) that people are like different soils. Each of us interacts with the seeds of the gospel in different ways. The same is true with evangelistic disciple-making. In that parable, Jesus stressed the importance of being like the good soil, receiving the Word, and bearing fruit for the kingdom.

     Southwestern Ohio is saturated in a sensual world that is 3D. It moves and engages them. It provides community experiences, even if it’s avatars interacting online. Most churches in CABA provide evangelism and discipleship that relies totally on “sit and get” methodology. Come to the class. Come hear the preacher. Watch this performance. Are we relegating believers to be spectators? Kyle Idleman was spot-on with his book, Not a Fan. The book is a call to get out of the stands and onto the playing field.

     Different people take more or less time to believe in Christ and eventually act to make a decision. When we share Christ and our faith with those who are lost, they may be closer to a decision than we may expect. Bill Fey who developed Share Jesus Without Fear likes to say that it takes about seven exposures to the gospel message before a person will surrender their heart to Jesus.

     And the same goes for us who are believers. Are we growing in our faith? Are we willing to make significant changes to the glory of God? It’s easy to say, “I’m sticking with what got me here. If I change it’ll destroy my credibility. Those in my church will think I was wrong all this time and I’ll lose my job.”

     Living out the faith is important for others who are watching our lives and how it benefits them. It can’t be done inside church walls and cocooning in our homes. Bringing the lost into our lives requires lifelong learning leading to a verbalization of our faith. As we interact, we watch them grow in their faith until Jesus is Lord. And then seamlessly, we walk with them into newness of life, encouraging them to bear spiritual fruit to the glory of God.

     One of the key aspects of the No Place Left training is smoothly moving from evangelism to studying the Bible. I'd love to see you Nov. 2-3 at the NPL event at New Hope, Loveland, Ohio. It's free for everyone in your church. Here's more details and info on how to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/no-place-left-cincinnati-touch-3-tickets-49916692170

--Mark Snowden is CABA's director of missional leadership.

Posted on September 20, 2018 10:00 PM by David Frasure
Categories: Disciple-making
   In a conference I attended in the early 80’s, a leader stated, “The world will never hear our concerns about abortion unless they see that we love children the way Jesus loved children.” God really challenged me with that thought. I went home and began to pray, “Lord let me learn to love children the way Jesus loved children.” In the years that followed, God led my wife and me to have four more children in addition to our two. I guess we need to be careful how we pray!
     In all seriousness, I wonder how praying such a prayer would impact pastors and teachers and churches today. Clearly, the Bible is filled with an emphasis on passing our faith along to the next generation. In Deuteronomy 6:6, we are told to teach the truth diligently to our children. Paul’s great prayer for the church in Ephesians 3:20-21 emphasizes God’s desire to see His glory in the church impact generation after generation. 
    Back when Sunday School was first used in churches, the emphasis was on reaching children. How to teach adults was an afterthought. I fear that many churches reverse that thinking today. Some even see
children’s ministry as unnecessary or optional. The absence of young families in many churches attests to the fact that children’s ministry has become an afterthought rather than a priority.
   The true test of our success in discipleship is the ability to carry it on to a new generation. Consider Paul’s challenge to Timothy to pass Bible teaching to “faithful men who will be able to teach others also” (2 Timothy 2:2).
    If the faith is not passed on to a new generation, the church becomes an endangered species! May God burden us and guide us in reaching and discipling a new generation for Christ. The good news is that they are more teachable now than they will ever be!
 
--David Frasure serves as CABA's Disciple-making Catalyst and pastors First Baptist, South Lebanon, Oh.
Posted on September 19, 2018 8:00 AM by Mark Snowden
When I led a Sunday School class for our church’s college students, I was astounded one Sunday when one long-time Christian and faithful attender blurted out, “Just tell us what to believe.”
 
My Baby Boomer generation grew up doubting the Establishment with its political corruption, humiliated tele-evangelists, rampant inflation, and unethical business practices. The Baby Boomer mantra was lifted straight from Karl Marx, “Question everything.”
 
This was unique to me. I belonged to a youth group at church, but went to public schools, participated in the student council, and played sports. I started looking at these college kids more closely. Over time I realized that it is possible for young adult followers of Jesus to live in a parallel universe that does not intersect with the larger society. Many Millennials that profess Christ were raised, schooled, dated, got jobs, married, and began the cycle all over again raising kids within a Christian bubble.
 
Millennials are an age grouping that includes the oldest members born in the early 1980s, now in their mid-30s, and it goes down in ages to those born 17 or 18 years ago. But when I look around churches where I teach and preach, I don’t see significant numbers of Millennials beyond those in the most vibrant youth groups. Just look at the 2010 census counts to see the majority of Millennials are unengaged.
 
And I’m convinced it’s not always the crowd that “loves Jesus, but hates the church” described in Steven Crainie’s book. Tom Gilson, in a review of the book unchristian by David Kinnaman, points fingers at our churches, “This book robbed me of sleep, revealing, as it does, how badly the church is disconnected from younger Americans, and how negatively we are viewed. The source of the disconnect, I’m convinced, is that our discipleship has been weak, sloganistic, not very thoughtful, not loving enough, shallow. Though 29% of Americans say they are highly committed to Jesus Christ, only 3% espouse a Biblical worldview, defined for research purposes as adhering to eight basic doctrines of Christian religion.”
 
Leaders of Bible studies using Bible Storying methods likely have the best chance of effective disciple-making among Millennials. However, I believe two groups of Millennials may have to be evangelized and discipled as if they were two different people groups. Those with a strong evangelical background may need to be challenged more to be evangelistic than those who are from the “lost” ranks. Those with a nominal Christian background are biblically illiterate. An active witness cannot assume those Millennials that they encounter with the gospel know any Bible stories, not to mention basic Christian doctrine. Bible verses used in tracts will be from an unknown context and use words unfamiliar with the lost. Millennials raised in the Christian bubble will have just as difficult time and will likely need cross-cultural training to gain significant relevance among their own peers. Believers need reproducible methods and tools that Storying provides.
 
Bible stories and Storying methodology provide vital tools for advancing the gospel among those in the next generation to the glory of God. Using Bible stories or proverbs as illustrative points in a conversation can flow naturally and planting seeds for future conversations. Being a friend that cares is one thing. Being involved in an important community project that they’re invited to be alongside you is probably even more important. Sharing life together provides a witness when it is verbalized in a relevant but moving story from God’s Word.
 
If an oral approach is ignored, I’m afraid that Millennials will keep considering Christ is no different than considering, well, Karl Marx.
 
Mark Snowden is Director of Missional Leadership for the Cincinnati Area Baptist Association.
Posted on August 6, 2018 9:00 AM by David Frasure
Categories: Disciple-making
“If you are content to live without revival, you will.” 
 
The quote above is from Byron Paulus, the president of Life Action Ministries and it has been difficult to get it out of my mind.  “Revival,” in the dictionary, has several meanings.  One of my favorites is, “restoring to usefulness.”  I’ve always admired how a person can take an old car out of the junkyard and restore it to its original beauty.  As we experience revival in our own lives, we are restored spiritually to a place of closeness with God and usefulness in His kingdom’s work.
 
When the topic of revival comes up in a church, we have a tendency to think of revival meetings of days gone by.  We would invite a guest speaker to spend a week or two preaching to us each night.  We might have special, outside musicians come in as well; and maybe, we’d throw in some special meals along the way and a free pizza a dinner for youth night!  The goal was to get the lost and the backslidden to come to church as we would pray for real revival in our own hearts and theirs.  We knew that we could not manufacture real revival, but our hope was that God would respond to our sincere prayers and He would bless with salvations and restoration in the lives of the people we invited.
 
Such revival meetings don’t seem to attract the people they once did.  With more and more school activities and the busy schedules of the average American family, such meetings seem almost impossible.  I wonder, however, if the lack of revival isn’t deeper than just living in a fast-paced world.  A friend of mine is fond of saying, “corporate revival always follows personal revival.”  In other words, the church can’t experience revival until individual Christians in the church experience revival for themselves.  Only God can bring revival to a person or a church or a nation, but we also have a responsibility to seek it.  How do we do that, though?
 
It begins of course with our relationship with God.  The closeness of that relationship depends on our regular communion with God.  Bill Elliff, in his book, The Presence Centered Church says it like this, “Your personal experience of God must be your highest priority.  Nothing must get in the way.  Everything must be built around this passion” (pg. 35).  The spiritual discipline of meeting with God and growing deeper in relationship with Him trumps all the other disciplines of the Christians life.  Our personal devotion time with God is essential for personal renewal.
 
Out of our communion with God comes the blessing of repentance.  Yes, I said, “blessing” of repentance.  It is a real blessing to have the Holy Spirit convict us of sin so that we can experience repentance.  God invites us, through this ministry of the Holy Spirit, to experience renewal.  We should welcome his close examination of our lives.  We should rejoice in it.  It is God loving us and longing for communion with us.  When He convicts, we must not excuse or blame.  We must be willing to follow through with restitution and clearing our conscience with others when that is needed.  Although repentance is a struggle, it is a wonderful blessing.  Without it, revival cannot occur.  With it, comes all the potential of a life on fire for Christ.
 
As we obey God in the prayer closet, we can obey Him outside of it.  Through surrendered obedience, we don’t just know God, we experience God.  As we experience God, revival becomes a reality in our hearts and has the potential of spilling over in the church.  May we never be content without it!
Posted on July 2, 2018 9:00 AM by David Frasure
Categories: Disciple-making, General
I value vacations.  I would rather sit in a comforter than on a wooden bench.  I like the feel of pulsating steams of water massaging my tired back in a hot sauna.  Ah, yes, comfort can be a very good thing.  Yet, comfort can also be a very dangerous thing.  In the work of God, we can love our comfort a little too much if we are not careful.  The result is a neglect of the Great Commission.  A complacency about discipleship.  An apathy toward worship.
 
The dangers of being spiritually, too comfortable are many.  We can miss opportunities to experience God at work in and through our lives, if we get too comfortable.  We can choose the easy, softer choices of life and neglect God’s invitation to grow in our faith.  Being too comfortable can cause us to overlook the lost and disregard a brother or sister in need.  The 39-year-old man maybe comfortable living in his parent’s basement playing video games all day, but if he wants to live a meaningful life of purpose, he needs to leave that comfort to embrace the challenges of life.  In a similar way, we need to be challenged to leave the comfort of our current level of spiritual growth and usefulness, to begin pursuing the next.
 
Churches can also become too comfortable.  We can get accustomed to the comfort of being a certain size as a church and forget that God has placed us in the middle of a real mission field of people who need to be reached.  We would never put out a sign saying, “No New People Welcome Here,” but churches can still communicate that message in many subtle ways if they are too comfortable.  Even in a Sunday School class or small group, we can delight in the people we have, to the neglect of the people we need to reach.  After all, we have a nice comfortable feel to our class as it is.  Why work on reaching someone new?
 
To overcome comfortableness, we need to remember that spiritual growth flourishes in discomfort.  Discomfort caused Abraham to leave Ur and Moses to go back to Egypt.  Discomfort allowed Joshua to face the challenges of Ai and Joseph to become the leader he needed to become to “save many people alive.”  We need our discomfort to motivate us to strive for more.
 
We must remember that our purpose in life is to know and love God with all our being and to love people as Jesus loved people.  That challenges us to dive deeper into His Word and prayer.  That keeps us moving out of our comfort zone to touch lives we have never touched.  The potential of our lives and the impact we can make by God’s grace will be diminished if we remain in a state of continual spiritual ease.
 
We must be reminded of the brevity of life if we are to overcome our comfortableness.  All of us want to make a difference in this life.  We want to leave a positive, spiritual mark on our family, our friends and our neighbors.  No Christian wants to look back on their lives one day and see a series of wasted opportunities to influence others for Christ and grow closer to Him.  Psalm 90 reminds us “to number our days, that we may gain a heart of wisdom.”  Becoming too comfortable can be very unwise.
 
There is nothing wrong with having a lemonade under an umbrella on a beautiful beach.  We all need time to pause, reflect and meditate.  Times of rest are essential, but we also know that relaxation won’t pay the bills and advance us in life.  Likewise, in our walk with God, we need to enjoy our seasons of blessings, but remember that life is too short to be comfortable in our complacency.
Posted on June 18, 2018 9:52 AM by Mark Snowden
Categories: Disciple-making
A local church invited me to be the “storyteller” at an evangelistic block party in a rural town. I had four sessions. In the first one, I cut out a golden calf from gold foil wrapping paper and was good to go. Well, I asked what an idol was and explained that God didn’t like idols. And then I told the Golden Calf story from Exodus 32. Now, there were 20 in the place listening to me, 15 of which were under the age of seven or eight years old. I gave it all I had, but stuck to the story. I had their rapt attention!

In true Bible Storying style and unlike most storytellers, I tested for comprehension. After telling the story, I began the listening task by asking one very simple question.

“What did you like best about the story?”

“The golden calf!”

Uh-oh! All the kids said they liked the golden calf the best. After one said it, they all nodded in agreement. Smiles came from the adults. My wife rolled her eyes. When I asked what they learned about God, one little girl said, “God loves calves!”

It was a crash and burn moment. Note to self—avoid Golden Calf story in a farming community where the kids love their cows!

There is an important moral to that story. The small group leader can do all he can do to select and tell the story, but unless he asks questions he never knows what people–especially kids—are really thinking. Oh, and yes, I switched to another Bible story with better results in the other three storytelling times.

Asking questions or lecturing is as different as hooks and clubs. A club is intended with a different purpose than a hook. What implement did a shepherd carry? A shepherd’s staff is universally depicted as a long, hooked rod that could pull the sheep in the right direction. If smacked with a club, a startled lamb could dart in any direction. A club is like an exclamation mark (!) where a hook is like a question mark (?). Let that stand as a reminder that disciple-makers need to use questions to guide the “lambs” in a small group to explore biblical truths as the Holy Spirit leads.

A small group leader committed to disciple-making will want to use questions to guide the dialogue about the Bible story. The teacher turns into a facilitator who draws out Truth in alignment with the Holy Spirit’s prompting.
Bible Storying methods encourage the small group leader to know the spiritual condition of each person in the group. He uses three different types of questions:

1.    Head questions are used to get the facts right. Did they understand the story? Discipleship is more than just facts, but this is the place to focus on biblical accuracy. Sometimes participants want you to speculate, but simply (and kindly) ask, “Well, what does the Bible say?”
2.    Heart questions probe at intent and choices made in the story. What do they need to change? I find that it really helps to bow your head and lead the group in a prayer for the Holy Spirit to speak to each person in alignment with John 16:13. The standard four questions to ask include: What do you like? What don’t you like? What did you learn about God? What did you learn about mankind? So what? What changes do you need to make because of this story?
3.    Hand questions are for personal application. Questions are geared toward others and their needs. Who do you know that needs this story? Who will tell this story? And then hold volunteers accountable for doing what they promised to do from one meeting time to another.

Making disciple-makers requires knowing the spiritual development progress of each believer. You never know, they might be off chasing golden calves.
 
Mark Snowden is the Director of Missional Leadership for the Cincinnati Area Baptist Association. The idea of hooks and clubs in Bible Storying is adapted from the book he wrote with the late Avery Willis titled Truth That Sticks: How to Communicate Velcro Truths in a Teflon World (NavPress 2010).
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