Blog
Posted on June 5, 2018 8:00 AM by Mark Snowden
Categories: Evangelism
In my ministry, I often hear well-intentioned men and women give their testimony. Is there a better way? How is it possible to improve upon one’s personal experience with Jesus? We live in a time when people are complimented for even sharing their faith! But what happens when we spend too much time on the "before Christ" part and the moment of salvation is unfortunately muted, stunted, and offers no handles that a lost person can grab?
Have you told someone your personal salvation story in a while? Your testimony should model how someone can be saved. We all want to glorify God in what we say to others. And so here’s your opportunity to re-examine how what you say can present God’s plan of salvation. Helping others have a clear path to Christ is the ultimate way to honor God with your testimony.

Make your personal story more powerful. We'll address a typical three-part testimony – before, during, and after.

Before: A life before Christ is typically self-centered, but there should also be acknowledgement of the Holy Spirit’s conviction of sin. There’s a point of recognizing that we all stand guilty before God. Many people in America’s post-modern society think sin is what happens when you get caught. Saying how you knew what sin was should be based upon biblical concepts of knowing what to do, but not doing it (James 4:17). Shorten your experiences before Christ. You certainly don’t want to give them new ideas that Satan will tempt them to try later.

During: Providing a model for a lost person should be your priority. A friend of mine once said he made a fact-based decision without much of a change of heart. He described it similar to “buying fire insurance.” Be very clear about the need to repent of your sins as well as surrendering yourself to Christ. That’s the brass ring the lost need to hang onto in your testimony. Describe how your personal relationship with Jesus began. Don’t rush it. Be thorough and know why you are saying what you’re saying. How you say it will likely become the model that a new believer will use in their own life. If you present a dozen Bible verses in random order, so will they. Since most people are oral learners, presenting the gospel in the form of your story is powerful when it includes key Bible truths. These can be conveyed in summary versions of Bible stories and it may be necessary to convey this part of your testimony in multiple meetings depending on the time you have available.

After: Practice explaining that your spiritual transformation was by God’s grace, not any effort of your own. Describe the difference your life has been because you have the Holy Spirit of God to guide you (John 16:13). It’s okay to describe a few good works you’ve done since, but they should convey more than accepting a new set of rules, making different moral choices, and even efforts you’ve made at changing certain behaviors. These can come off as man-centered. Work hard to humbly give God the glory for allowing you to experience life according to what the Bible says. Just like the “before” section, this should be brief, too.

In a three-minute testimony, consider these parts: 30 seconds before decision, two minutes describing the decision, and 30 seconds after the decision.

It helps to immediately follow-up to giving your testimony by asking questions. Ask them if they would like to make a similar decision to follow Christ! If your “during the decision” part was presented carefully, then the lost person will know exactly what they should do—and how they will share their own personal salvation story to others one day. When used by the Lord, it's more powerful!
 
--Mark Snowden is the Director of Missional Leadership, Cincinnati Area Baptist Association
Posted on May 1, 2018 9:00 AM by Mark Snowden
Categories: Evangelism
Maj. James Howard became a Flying Tiger ace in China. He went on to become a P-51B fighter pilot in World War II. During one mission, he was separated from his squadron, but found the lead B-17 Flying Fortress bomber group. Each bomber had 30 men on board and there were ten planes in the air when he joined up; 300 souls were at stake. Kenneth Martin led the bomber group that day. The Luftwaffe soon dove toward the bombers. Howard gunned his fighter’s engine and climbed straight toward them. He put his training and experience to use as he shot down three planes on several passes. After each engagement, he returned to escort the lead bomber. Howard did this several times officially downing six planes, damaging many others, and even chased off the enemy when he didn’t have any more bullets. He stayed with the lead bomber group until they were back safely where he could head to his own airbase. No bombers in that group were lost that day. (For more go to http://acepilots.com/eto/jim_howard.html)
 
When confronted with lostness in your community, what do you do? Are you ready to engage people with the gospel? Do you back away or do you pray a quick prayer, trust the Holy Spirit to empower you as an Acts 1:8 witness, and warmly meet a new opportunity to share your faith in Christ?
 
The best training I have come across is preparing saved people to give their own personal testimonies. When they tell HOW they got saved, people catch it.

It is important for you to tell your own personal testimony and how you have been used of the Lord to lead people to Jesus. Lead from the front! Take on lostness as a lifestyle and “kick up some dust.”
 
Get people in your church used to hearing and giving testimonies. Invite people with a variety of testimonies to stand up and speak up each Sunday. Coach them on how to give their testimony in three minutes or so, focusing on what Jesus did to save them. You want to help other church members hear examples of what they need to do. And make sure those who testify talk about repenting of their sins. Those who were recently baptized are great people to use, but don’t forget about the most influential people in your church. And don’t be shy about videotaping a shut-in’s testimony and playing it.
 
That said, my counsel to pastors is to lead from the front. What you do, your church members will see and copy. Invite a highly relational guy in your church to go with you as your wingman to follow-up on every visitor in the past year. After three months, switch and you be his wingman. After another three months, suggest to this guy that he needs to get his own wing man and you get someone new. You can tell your Sunday School teachers to follow your lead and get their own wingman! You can’t get this from any book other than the Bible – check out Matthew 10 and Luke 10. There’s great sermon fodder and discipleship lessons in those passages.
 
Major Howard left the airfield day after day with a mission. For his courage on January 11, 1944, Howard received the only Congressional Medal of Honor awarded to an airman in the European Theater. When you leave your own personal hanger, are you on the lookout for ways to meet those without Christ? Are you staying on mission day after day? A neighbor once complained to me that when he came to faith in Christ, he quickly learned that he was just another notch on some guy’s spiritual gun belt. We have a bigger purpose in mind. Are you leading people to Jesus with disciple-making in mind? It’s a target-rich environment when you’re “flying” for the Lord.
 
Mark Snowden is the Director of Missional Leadership (DOM) for the Cincinnati Area Baptist Association.
Posted on April 23, 2018 9:28 AM by Mark Snowden
Categories: Evangelism
A young pastor once scheduled a meeting with me. He wanted to know how he could get his church to become active witnesses for Christ. He had a pen and paper and was ready to write down a training program or book he could use. However, my advice was to model the behavior he expected of them.

MAWL is an acronym for Model, Assist, Watch, and Leave that was developed by then-IMB missionary Curtis Sergeant. The idea is that the disciple-maker exhibits the kind of life they want others to follow. Curtis also said, “Am I a disciple that Jesus would want others to be like?”

And once started, disciple-making efforts must become something each disciple does that is self-feeding. If not, then the disciples will never do it for themselves. There’s an intentional progression to live it out, help others to get it, observe them doing it, and then get out of the way!

Most church leaders are trained to value a new believer’s decision to follow Jesus. That’s a huge step. I once led a high school student to faith in Jesus, but he flinched at the idea of being baptized. For him, the decision was enough. Yes, believer’s baptism by immersion is an active of obedience.

And Jesus wants all believers to make disciples that make disciples! Too many times we train believers to lead others to faith in Jesus without giving thought to how they can pass along what they have learned—and that’s the rub.

Making disciples like Jesus did means getting personally involved. Discipling is a means to build up individuals into maturity in Christ. Apply this progression to your own situation as you seek to make disciples:

1.    Establish formal and informal training times, using Bible stories if possible to let learners vicariously catch a biblical truth. (More is caught than taught.)
2.    Explain to them what they don’t understand, which involves listening. Choose Bible passages in advance that best address different scenarios they’ll encounter.
3.    Coach believers by either making corrections or reinforcing spiritual progress. Spiritual transformation takes on a biblical worldview that is more than just doing the right things, valuing the right things, and knowing the right facts.
4.    Support new disciples by making some tweaks as necessary. You’re not a friend at this point or a judge, just a recognized discipler of Jesus that can speak into their lives.
5.    Fully authenticate your disciples’ actions by empowering them to work unaided. In other words, turn ‘em loose!

Every believer with a teachable heart can be taught to make disciples like Jesus did, but it will require a major shift in all of our disciple-making efforts. We have to be there for them over time.

Disciple-making training that keeps students on the move like Jesus did will mean that one day there will be a branching, a leaving, as new people hear about Jesus, develop a relationship with Him, and join new groups as they form. This may mean that the church has a new mature disciple-maker, or it could mean that the church sends out missionaries and church planters. For more ideas, check out Truth That Sticks, 129-134.
 
--Mark Snowden is the Director of Missional Leadership (DOM) for the Cincinnati Area Baptist Association.
Posted on March 23, 2018 9:00 AM by Mark Snowden
Categories: Evangelism
Evangelicals began using altar calls and invitations in the 1830s. From Charles Finney’s invitations to pulpits today, the same urgency drives a need for every person to respond in faith to the Holy Spirit’s prompting. Half-baked and incomplete invitations can inoculate the lost to thinking that they have heard all they ever need to hear.
What response does your sermon generate? When Peter preached, the Holy Spirit convicted people to action.

•    At Pentecost: “…they came under deep conviction and said… ‘Brothers, what must we do?” (Acts 2:37 HCSB) And 3,000 were baptized.
•    In the Temple: “But many who heard the message believed, and the number of the men came to 5,000” (Acts 4:4 HCSB).
•    In Caesarea: “While Peter was still speaking these words, the Holy Spirit came down on all who heard the message” (Acts 10:47 HCSB). And Cornelius’ entire household was saved and baptized.

Peter’s sermons were delivered with boldness attributed to being filled with the Holy Spirit that Jesus promised would come upon Peter and all the disciples (Acts 1:8). Peter fully believed that delivering a message was conveying truth and would save hearers from the imminent coming judgment of God through forgiveness of sins (Acts 10:42-43).

The late Roy Fish served for years as the distinguished professor of evangelism at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Tex. In the book, Preaching Evangelistically: Proclaiming the Saving Message of Jesus by Al Fasol and others, Dr. Fish wrote:
 
Real expectation and confidence in God will seldom be disappointed. Even the very words used in the invitation should express confidence and expectancy. For that reason, it is not honoring to the Lord to say Sunday after Sunday, “Isn’t there one person here today who will respond to the claims of Christ and come?” That question should be asked like this: Not “Isn’t there one?” but “How many of you here today will receive Christ as your Savior?” Rather than “Won’t you come?” make it, “As you come, I will be here to greet you.” … Words something like this should be expressed: “This morning, if you are willing to turn from your sins and trust Jesus Christ as your Savior, I invite you to slip out from where you’re standing and come forward. I will be here at the front of the auditorium to meet you as you come.”  Excerpted from: www.lifeway.com, cited 12/14/12.

When delivering a gospel invitation, it is important to deliver it clearly, expecting a response. In Romans 10:17, Paul said that faith comes by “hearing,” which meant receiving a report in order to take action. There is a need for hearers to encounter Jesus in such a way that it brings spiritual transformation. Hearing does not mean words just come flying by our ears, but communicating so that next steps are understood. And this often means allowing for the adequate time needed to invite them to salvation.

God used the messages of Peter to draw listeners to Himself. Through the power of the Holy Spirit, He can use your invitations, too.
 
Mark Snowden is the Director of Missional Leadership (DOM) for the Cincinnati Area Baptist Association.
Posted on February 18, 2018 10:00 AM by Mark Snowden
Categories: Evangelism
Last week I met a neighbor across the street. I tried witnessing to him and he tried witnessing to me. It turned out that he was a retired Methodist pastor. And he was born-again. In our next encounter, I plan to discuss what he’s doing as a disciple-maker.
 
A believer’s life perspective changes when he prioritizes making disciples. He listens to know if the person he meets is lost or saved. If he’s lost, is he in transit or living nearby? If he’s saved, then is he making disciples?
Most person-to-person evangelism plans end with an invitation for the seeker to pray what has been called a “sinner’s prayer.” Share the good news about Jesus, but consider ending it a little differently.

This is a crossroads of sorts in your testimony. A new question to ask is:
 
Are there others that you would like to invite to know more about Jesus?
 
I’m asking you to think groups, not individuals.
 
If the answer is “no,” then continue with the gospel presentation and ask for a decision as the Holy Spirit prompts you to do so.

If the answer is “yes,” arrange a time when you and your witnessing partner can meet with both the seeker and those he invites. Missionary friends have told me that when a group of ten or so meet, then usually six or seven accept Christ. This can form a small group! This is particularly important among families from a religion to Christianity who might want to ostracize an individual. However, when groups make the decision simultaneously, they often avoid individualized persecution.
 
When Tom Wolf was teaching at Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary, he wrote a short paper called “Oikos Evangelism.” He wrote, “An oikos was the fundamental and natural unit of society, and consisted of one’s sphere of influence–his family, friends, and associates. And equally important, the early church spread through oikoses–circles of influence and association.” You can pick up additional insights by downloading Dr. Wolf’s paper here.
Meeting someone new may introduce you to the next Apostle Paul of our day. It can form groups like Cornelius’ entire household, too, that can start a new church, a new small group, or possibly disband to assimilate into other existing groups.
 
Go ahead! Add a new question to your encounter with a lost person. “Are there others that you would like to invite to know more about Jesus?” And see what God wants to do in their circle of influence.
 
Mark Snowden is the Director of Missional Leadership (DOM) for the Cincinnati Area Baptist Association.
Posted on November 2, 2017 10:00 AM by Josh Carter
Categories: Evangelism
Many churches do outreach events each Fall. If your community is like mine, Trunk-or-Treats and Harvest Festivals seemed to abound this year. But if your church is like mine, two things are equally true: 1) You don’t do these type of community events just because you like to. You do them with the hopes of engaging people with the gospel and seeing people come be a part of your church family. 2) Following up with guests from these types of events can be difficult at best. That being said, here are five ways you can see better results from your Fall outreach and other community events.

1) Be Intentionally Evangelistic. A lot of times we think we need to go soft on the gospel to attract people to our church. We might not even say this out loud, but we let our fear of offending people sway what we do at these type of events. In truth, I’d say this actually has the opposite effect of what we might be hoping to accomplish. These people have come to your church property. In general, they are expecting people to talk to them about faith and church related things. What happens when we aren’t direct is that they are constantly on guard about who is going to “hit them over the head” with some Christian ninja sneak attack. Being forward helps them put people at ease and opens up conversations throughout the night. We did this by stopping all games and activities each hour and doing a short welcome and gospel presentation from a central location. This went incredibly smooth and most people seemed to really enjoy the friendly welcome.

2) Invite Them Immediately. During the event we had several trunks that promoted other upcoming events going on at the church. As we handed out candy at these trunks we also handed out invitations to the families. Doing this gave us opportunity to let them know we were serious about continuing to minister to their families. An event can come off as a gimmick if you don’t show the families that you have a plan to continue to care for them.
 
3) Follow-Up Makes A Big Difference. Here is where most of us fail. The community event is over and we are off to the next thing on our calendar. If you do this, you are missing one of the greatest opportunities your church has to personally connect to the community. Here is how we did it: First, we registered almost everyone who came. Registration was required in order to have tickets for the free food we were providing. Each ticket was for a different food item. Not everyone registered, but a majority did. Second, we scanned the registration forms and sent them to a trusted data-entry company. That sounds like big bucks, it’s not! In fact, it might have been the best $20 we spent all year! We used  Invensis Global Outsourcing Services.  They compiled all our scanned contact information into a simple excel document within 48 hours. I was easily able to then forward the document on to church members who called the families, thanked them for coming, invited them to church, and asked how we could be praying for them. Families were blown away that we were thanking them for coming.
 
4) Follow-Up Again. Can this one really be overstated? In addition to phone calls, we also send out a “thank you” email. In the email we included a link to a short survey that asked about what we could do better, if we could add them to our emailing list, and how likely their family was to come to our church in the next few months. We received great advice and a lot of really positive feedback. In every follow-up we have asked if the family already has a church home. If the family responds that they do we then remove them from the next layer of contact. For those that don’t have a church home, we plan to send postcards in several weeks to advertise our Christmas sermon series and Christmas events. None of these ideas cost a lot or take a lot of man-power, but they do take intentional planning.
 
5) Be ready for guests. Over the next few weeks you will likely notice an increased number of guest visit your church. If you are not ready for them, they will leave as quickly as they came. Here is an article by Lifeway on how you can be ready: 7 Do’s and Don’ts of Welcoming Guest to Your Congregation.
None of these things are rocket-science. If they were I wouldn’t be able to do them. They also don’t cost very much and they don’t take very much time. Any church of any size ought to be able to put some if not all of these ideas into practice. As you do, pray that God would use your efforts to draw people to your church, to reach people with His gospel, and to build up His body.
 
Josh Carter is CABA's Leadership Catalyst and pastors Clough Pike Baptist in Cincinnati.
Posted on August 3, 2017 10:00 AM by David Frasure
Categories: Evangelism
Have you heard the new lyrics to an old song?  It goes like this, “Old McBaptist had a farm; E-I-E-I-O.  And ‘round that farm he plants the Word; E-I-E-I-O.  With a plow, plow here and a plant, plant there…”  The tune is familiar and hopefully, the words do not seem so strange to us.  The Bible often uses the imagery of a farmer when speaking of the work of God.  Jesus spoke of the sower going out to sow the seed of God’s Word.  Paul encouraged Timothy to be like a hard-working farmer as he discipled people and looked for spiritual fruit in their lives. 
 
Every farmer knows that in order to receive a harvest in the fall, someone must plow the field, sow the seed, pray for rain and eventually, harvest the crop.  It would be foolish to expect a harvest when there has been no plowing, or planting, or praying.  A dormant field does not a harvest make!
 
A dormant church cannot expect a harvest either.  Members of God’s church must get themselves face-to-face with lost people and have a gospel conversation in order to reach them for Christ.  The Great Commission reminds us that we are witnesses wherever we go, but we can also be intentional about setting up gospel encounters.
 
Dave Frasure is CABA's Disciple-making Catalyst and pastors FBC So. Lebanon. 
 
Posted on June 12, 2017 8:00 AM by David Frasure
It is an old saying, but it is still true.  You never get a second chance to make a first impression.  It is especially true in the work of the ministry.  How Sunday School classes receive their quests is critical to the success of the class in reaching new people.  Another critical factor in keeping the guests coming back is follow-up.  It is exciting to have a big week like Vacation Bible School and see the potential of a church full of children, but how well we follow-up with these kids and their families often determines if we will ever see them again. 
 
Here are five facts to consider:
 
1. Follow-up as a demonstration of biblical hospitality.  The Bible says, “Be kindly affectionate to one another with brotherly love, in honor giving preference to one another… given to hospitality” (Romans 12:10-13).  Good follow-up is simply a good, hospitable way of treating your guests.
 
2. Good follow-up with guests is a good ministry strategy.  There is no better prospect for your class than the one that visited last week.  She has already demonstrated a level of interest by attending.  If she can get connected and build friendships with others in the class, there is a good chance she’ll be back.  If she gets a call or visit from the teacher, it is even more impressive. 
 
3. The most successful follow-up happens outside the classroom.  We can invite our guests to class parties and ministry projects.  We can visit in their home to see if they have questions about the church or Sunday School.  We can send a thank you card.  We can call and find out if there are any special prayer needs and pray over the phone with the prospect.  We can invite them over for pizza and a movie.  All these things are living demonstrations to your guests that you care about them and really want them in your class.
 
4. The more people who are involved in follow-up, the better!  People are living and working with others every day, but often without making a single friend.  People in our culture long for the happy friendships they see on the sitcoms, yet find themselves lonely and isolated.  They want meaningful relationships with others outside their own homes.  The Sunday School class offers the perfect opportunity for such relationships.  The potential for these relationships grows as more of your class members are involved in the follow-up process.
 
5. Good follow-up is like most good ideas—sooner or later it boils down to someone doing the work.  No teacher can do all the follow-up that is needed, so have an assistant or enlist a class Evangelism Leader to help you with good follow-up.  Each class should keep a record of the guests who attend.  The Evangelism Leader keeps that information and assigns or makes contacts on a regular basis.
 
One teacher I heard of made a list of the class prospects that had visited over time and asked for four volunteers that would be willing to make phone calls and write letters.  The teacher divided the list by four, and assigned the names to the four volunteers.  Each volunteer contacted the people on his or her list that week.  Then the teacher switched the lists for the second week, and so on.  Every prospect was contacted four weeks in a row by four different people in the class.  It wasn’t long before the people on the prospect list became enrollees and regular attendees of the class.  The follow-up project took very little time, but it produced amazing results.
 
The Nike shoe company uses the slogan, “Just Do It.”  It is simple and to the point.  When it comes to contacting absentees and prospects, we, also, need to prioritize and just do it!
 
Dave Frasure is CABA's Disciple-making Catalyst and pastors FBC So. Lebanon, Oh. 
Posted on April 10, 2017 8:11 AM by Tom Pendergrass
Categories: Evangelism
2017 Evangelism Catalyst CABA Report
Tom Pendergrass
 
It has been a joy to serve again this year in Evangelism, this time as the Evangelism Catalyst for CABA. It has been a year of transition in understanding the new role for each Catalyst and my role in particular. It has been an honor to serve alongside the men who serve as Catalyst Leaders and alongside Mark Snowden. His friendship, encouragement, exhortation, and passion are several reasons why we brought him on board. To hear and see his vision and missional heart has been an inspiration.
 
I have focused the last few months on our Evangelistic Strategy, leading out in County-by-County meetings. We met in eight different counties and were graciously hosted by pastors in CABA who did a remarkable job! We had 26 churches participate. We followed up that training with our Evangelism Roundtable hosted by Clough Pike. We had eleven churches participate in which Jack Helton, Mark, and I led sessions. We also viewed “The Case for Christ” movie excerpts. This evangelistic movie is out for a special showing in theaters on April 7.
 
I wanted to give a special shout out to Jack Helton, our State Evangelism director and to NAMB who provided our Three Circles Evangelism Kits for free. Jack’s leadership and passion for souls is a resource I highly encourage our pastors to use.
 
Disaster Relief has fallen under my umbrella and I so look forward to getting to sit down with all our leaders as we plan toward the future and expand our borders. CABA can take great thanks for the tremendous job out Mud-Out unit does every year, working alongside our NAMB partners. We will announce soon a couple of dates to meet and network together to see Disaster Relief expanded in CABA.
 
The Block Party Ministry is underway! A special thanks to Patti and all the she does to set this up. Registration is now online as the TRESS, the Trailer Reservation System at www.cincinnatibaptist.com. Please remember that this ministry is used virtually non-stop once the weather breaks and the sun begins to shine again in Ohio—160 times in 2016. Make every effort to leave the equipment better than when you receive it. We also stress that you need to be trained before you can use the trailer. These help meet insurance requirements.  Please check the CABA website for the next training you can attend. The team at Lakota Hills do an awesome job of hosting and training our church leaders.
 
One final thought that I would like to leave you with is what I stressed at all our Evangelism Training events, “NEVER DO MINISTRY ALONE!” We exist to make disciples and train up the next generation of CABA and Kingdom leaders.
 
See you at the Evangelism Expo April 29 that we’re hosting at Urbancrest!
 
Posted on June 1, 2016 11:02 AM by Mark Snowden
Categories: Evangelism
Maj. James Howard was a fighter pilot in World War II. During one mission, he was separated from his squadron, but found the lead B-17 Flying Fortress bomber group. Each bomber had 30 men on board and there were ten planes in the air when he joined up; 300 souls were at stake. The Luftwaffe soon dove toward the bombers. Howard gunned his Mustang P-51B fighter’s engine and climbed straight toward them. After each engagement, he returned to escort the lead bomber. Howard downed six planes, damaged many others, and even chased off the enemy when he didn’t have any more bullets. He stayed with the lead bomber group until they were back safely where he could head to his own airbase. No bombers in that group were lost that day.
 
When confronted with lostness in your community, what do you do? Are you ready to engage people with the gospel? Do you back away or do you pray a quick prayer, trust the Holy Spirit to empower you as an Acts 1:8 witness, and warmly meet a new opportunity to share your faith in Christ? Are you living as an intentional witness?
 
My counsel to pastors is to lead from the front. What you do, your church members will see and copy. Kevin Harvey, author of Organic Evangelism, put it this way, “Lead it, live it.” Micah Fries, Lifeway’s Assoc. VP Research, said in my presence, “Don’t make friends SO that you can tell them about Jesus. Make friends AND tell them about Jesus.”
Get off the ground by recruiting a highly relational guy in your church to go with you as your wingman. Follow-up on every visitor in the past year. After three months, switch and you be his wingman. After another three months, suggest to this guy that he needs to get his own wingman and you get someone new. Enlist small group leaders to follow your lead and get their own wingman.
 
Major Howard left his airfield day after day on a mission. For his courage on January 11, 1944, Howard received the only Congressional Medal of Honor awarded to an airman in the European Theater. When you leave home each day, are you on the lookout for ways to meet those without Christ? Are you staying on mission day after day?
It’s a target-rich environment when you’re “flying” for the Lord.
 
(c) 2016 Mark Snowden